NVIDIA
Image Courtesy: NVIDIA

NVIDIA has announced that it is no longer supporting the devices with the 32-bit version of Windows 7, Windows 8.1 and Windows 10. NVIDIA is also ending support for 32-bit versions of Linux and FreeBSD. The build 390 is the last update for the 32-bit operating systems.

The 32-bit systems of Windows 7, Windows 8.1, Windows 10 are still getting GeForce Game Ready Driver updates. The company recently announced that no new features will be released for these devices while NVIDIA plans to roll out security fixes for the 32-bit operating systems, but only until January 2019.

“After Release 390, NVIDIA will no longer release drivers for 32-bit operating systems for any GPU architecture. Later driver release versions will not operate, nor install, on 32-bit operating systems. Driver enhancements, driver optimizations, and operating system features in driver versions after Release 390 will not be incorporated back into Release 390 or earlier versions,” NVIDIA explained in a blog post.

NVIDIA will continue to general security updates for NVS 310 and NVS 315 graphic boards until 2019, while the critical security bugs will be addressed until December 2021.

“Later driver release versions will not operate, nor install, on systems using the above products. Driver enhancements, driver optimizations, and operating system features in driver versions after Release 390 will not be incorporated back into Release 390 or earlier versions,” NVIDIA said.

NVIDIA’s decision to end support for older devices makes sense since the majority of gaming PCs are now powered by the 64-bit version of operating systems. If you are still using a 32-bit system, you should upgrade to the supported hardware.

  • Christopher Wortman

    And not a tear was shed. I honestly would like to see 32bit processors go the way of the dodo bird, 16 bit processors and dinosaurs, extinct. Having to support 32 bit has to be the biggest headache for programmers. 32 bit Windows is not the same as 64 bit Windows, as is Linux and Mac OS. I can not see the reason to keep it alive at all as it offers no real cost saving benefits and ends up costing consumers more in the long run when they find out that PC they bought off the shelf a month ago is using ancient technology and some applications that they legitimately pay for do not support it.